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1, boulevard Berbigny, 76200 Dieppe, France

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Work & Art: Screening & Panel Discussion

Self-capital (2009), film still, Melanie Gilligan

The screening and panel discussion will be exploring the relationship between 'work' and artistic practice, but also opening up wider conversations about the dark side of cultural capital and the position of the creative industries, questioning the slipperiness between 'flexibility' and precocity, and unpacking the increasing assumption that who we are is defined by what we do

Chaired by: Tom Hickey, Lecturer in Critical Theory, Culture and Politics at University of Brighton 

Tickets are available here

Self-capital is screened courtesy the artist and Galerie Max Mayer, Düsseldorf

Date / Location: 21 June, Fabrica Gallery, Brighton, 6.30-9.00pm

Screenings

Self-capital (2009), Melanie Gilligan

Since the 2008 financial crisis, Melanie Gilligan has made a trilogy of films that take the form of mini-series, which reflect and interpret the effects of late capitalism, and particularly the strains and stresses of austerity measures. For Diep~Haven, we will screen the three-part series 'Self-capital', where we see a single character embody and play out multifarious aspects of labour and the economy: the actress performs as both analyser and analysand, cashier and consumer.

Monster (2016), Jeremy Hutchison

In this video, the employees of a peanut factory work tirelessly at their stations, performing repetitive tasks. But while bodies and machines function ordinarily, the material input of their about has been removed: there is not a peanut to be seen. The factory reproduces its own labour conditions.

Panel

Jeremy Hutchison is a London-based artist whose work explores production and consumption. He Has collaborated with workers in factories around the world in the production of his practice, which includes performance, installation and film.

Daniel Kelly is an artist and founder of DKUK in Peckham, a gallery and functioning hair salon where paying clients have their hair cut in front of art in place of a mirror. Kelly also pioneered Capitalist Artist Scum, a series of haircut interviews that investigate how artists and cultural workers make a living, as an Associate of Open School East in 2015.

 

Precarious Workers Brigade

Date / Location: 22 June, Fabrica Gallery, Brighton, 3.00-5.00pm

Screening: The Future of Work and Death
(2016)

Directed by Sean Blacknell and Wayne Walsh

The Future of Work and Death is a documentary concerning the exponential growth of technology and where it is taking us. The film focuses on how future technology could significantly change the two inevitable features of the human experience: punching the clock and fading away. It explores how advanced automation, AL and technological singularity could be achievable in the next 30 years. How job obsolescence and technological unemployment could consequently occur and how digital immortality may not be a thing of science fiction. Worldwide experts in the fields of futurology, anthropology, neuroscience and philosophy share their thoughts on these future advancements. 

Tickets available here.

Work, Non-Work and the Future of Work: Screening & Discussion

So Far (2017), film still, Coline Dupuis

 

Discussion led by: Dr. Benedict Burbridge, Co-Director of Centre for Photography and Visual Culture, Sussex University

Dr. Benedict Burbridge will present ideas and reflections on the subject and screened works, seeking to open up a wider discussion amongst the event attendees. The event will be a useful way of unpacking an often overlooked tension between non-work and leisure, and also considering how and why work has become so intrinsically bound to one's sense of self, yet also challenging us to imagine how we might live if work was no longer a precondition for a 'functioning' society. 

Tickets are available here.

Date / Location: 22 June, Fabrica Gallery, Brighton, 6.30-9.00pm

Screenings

So Far (2017), Coline Dupuis

Dupuis' film is commissioned by Diep~Haven and was produced during her residency in and around Newhaven and Dieppe in May this year. The film concerns the automation of the lighthouses and the disappearance of the profession of lighthouse keeper. Mixing testimonies and fiction, Coline draws on the history of the lighthouse of Ailly located in the commune of Saint Marguerite sur Mer and the Belle Tout lighthouse, near Eastbourne, which is now a guesthouse. 

New Eelam (2016), Christopher Kulendran Thomas in collaboration with Annika Kuhlmann

Christopher Kulendran Thomas' work focuses on ways of reimagining pre-existing, oppressive social structures and adapting, or even exploding them, to create new ways of living. His ongoing project, New Eelam, in collaboration with Annika Kuhlmann, draws on Kulendran Thomas' Sri Lankan heritage and his research into the self-governing society of Eelam, which was destroyed in 2009. New Eelam uses inspiration from the ideaologies of the old Ealam as a potential approach, based on the neb-marxist collective ownership, to improve our existing living and working standards for the future. 

An Experiment in Leisure (2016), Manon de Boer

De Boer's film takes its name from a text by psychologist Marion Milner, and addresses the tension between non-work and leisure, following the natural cadences of a thought-process and the necessity for an artist to intuitively allow for pauses or breaks in 'work' in order to eventually be more productive. 

Diep~Haven Festival Film Programme: WORK

Date / Location: 24-25 June, Denton Island Community Centre, Newhaven, 12.00-5.00pm

Screenings

The Photocopier Who Fell in Love with Me (2016), Rosie Carr

Part-performance, part-PowerPoint presentation, The Photocopier Who Fell in Love with Me is a fantasy tale about desire and fetishisation of technology and automation, but which also confronts the dangerous paradox of expanding one's imagination whilst within the limitations of an office or mundane working environment. What happens when one is at once mind-numbingly bored, whilst allowing oneself to obsessively daydream at work. It's surprisingly easy to look busy at work when you're actually concentrating on something else...

 

So Far (2017), Coline Dupuis

Dupuis' film is commissioned by Diep~Haven and was produced during her residency in and around Newhaven and Dieppe in May this year. The film concerns the automation of the lighthouses and the disappearance of the profession of lighthouse keeper. Mixing testimonies and fiction, Coline draws on the history of the lighthouse of Ailly located in the commune of Saint Marguerite sur Mer and the Belle Tout lighthouse, near Eastbourne, which is now a guesthouse. 

Self-capital (2009), Melanie Gilligan

Since the 2008 financial crisis, Melanie Gilligan has made a trilogy of films that take the form of mini-series, which reflect and interpret the effects of late capitalism, and particularly the strains and stresses of austerity measures. For Diep~Haven, we will screen the three-part series 'Self-capital', where we see a single character embody and play out multifarious aspects of labour and the economy: the actress performs as both analyser and analysand, cashier and consumer.

Monster (2016), Jeremy Hutchison

In this video, the employees of a peanut factory work tirelessly at their stations, performing repetitive tasks. But while bodies and machines function ordinarily, the material input of their about has been removed: there is not a peanut to be seen. The factory reproduces its own labour conditions.

Gone to Croatan (2014), film still, Patrick Goddard

Gone to Croatan (2014), Patrick Goddard

Goddard's politically loaded and narrative-based works undermine themselves with a self-defeating black comedy. Gone to Croatan is a fictional documentary that operates in part as a contemporary English satire on the book Walden  by Henry David Thoreau. "Not working seems like awfully hard work, doesn't it?" asks Goddard's caricature version of himself, as he delves into the strange life of the anarchy-primitivist protagonist Adam, who, having dropped out of 'the rat race', lives in a small hut in the countryside. 

The Embarrasadors (2014), Guy Oliver

Oliver's work primarily deals with the artist's understanding of his own mortality and existence in relation to external socio-political events that have occurred concomitantly to his own life, including his identity as both art-worker and artist. The Embarrasadors is a short film that humorously draws attention to the paradoxes of working in an environment that prides itself on 'high culture' yet reinforces laborious, uncreative and precarious conditions for its employees. 

Presentation of Diep~Haven 2017: WORK/ TRAVAIL + artists in residence

Date / Location: 24 June, Denton Island Community Centre, Newhaven, 12.30-1.30pm

Screening: I, Daniel Blake (2016)

Date / Location: 25 June, Hillcrest Community Centre, Newhaven, 3.30-5.30pm

Manoeuvre (2017), Charlotte Perrin

Festival Curator Philippe Terrier-Hermann & Justine Hermant, Diep~Haven Coordinator will introduce this year's wider festival themes and programme, and the projects by artists in residence Coline Dupuis, Laura Borsch-Kihn, Alexis Manchion and Charlotte Perrin. 

The UK programme is supported by Arts Council England, Newhaven Town Council, Sussex Community Development Association and Fabrica Gallery

I, Daniel Blake is the product of over two years' embedded research investigating and interviewing those who have dropped through the cracks of the British welfare system. Following a heart attach, Loach's 59 year old protagonist, Daniel Blake, can't return to work, yet is denied the financial benefits necessary to support him during his convalescence. Based in Newcastle, this film follows the story, synonymous with thousands of other cases in England, of Blake's struggle, not only for economic support but of basic human compassion.

Courtesy of Entertainment One and Sixteen Films

Tickets available here